Captivating Natalie Dormer / Natalie-Dormer.com • • Your best source for everything Natalie DormerJust another WordPress site

Welcome to Captivating Natalie Dormer one of the largest and longest running sources dedicated to British Actress Natalie Dormer (formely at natalie-dormer.com). Natalie is best known for her role as Anne Boleyn in Showtime's The Tudors but you also may recognise her from Casanova, Flawless and Game of Thrones. Currently, you can find Natalie as the voice of Dr. Lexi T'Perro in the video game Mass Effect: Andromeda and in upcoming roles as Mrs. Appleyard in the TV Miniseries Picnic at Hanging Rock, as Sofia in In Darkness and as Eliza Merrett in The Professor and the Madmen.

Captivating aims your most up-to-date and comprehensive source for Natalie. Check back daily for all the latest news, photos and info. Thank you for visiting the site and supporting Natalie and her career!

June 12, 2018   /   Mel   /   Photo Gallery Television Productions The Fades (2011)

   

Gallery Link:
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June 12, 2018   /   Mel   /   Photo Gallery Television Productions The Fades (2011)

   

Gallery Link:
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May 03, 2018   /   Claudia   /   News Picnic at Hanging Rock (2018) Projects Television Productions

Natalie Dormer knew “Picnic at Hanging Rock” was the perfect next project for her when she received a personal letter from director Larysa Kondracki.

“It said, ‘I need this woman not to be an archetype. I need her to be three-dimensional, psychological, littered with flaws and fears. And I need the humanity of her so that she’s not just a bitch,’” Dormer tells Variety of the note.

Kondracki also wrote, “nobody would be able to do that like Natalie Dormer.”

It was a “seductive” pitch for Dormer, who then hopped on a video chat to further talk through the vision for the six-episode limited series based on Joan Lindsay’s 1967 novel. (The story was previously adapted for the big screen in 1975.)

The plot centers on the mysterious disappearance of four young women from an Australian boarding college and the damage it does to the school, its staff and students, and ultimately the society around them. It is set in 1900, but Dormer, who was given the first three of Beatrix Christian’s scripts when they were still in early draft form, knew the project was going to be far from a simple period drama.

“Beatrix was a playwright before she was a screenwriter, and in the way she writes her text there is so much subtext that I was just immediately like, ‘Who the f— are these women? This is amazing’,” Dormer says. “There was something in those first few scripts, but the way Larysa spoke of her vision, tonally, it just felt so fresh, so brave [and] courageous in the mashing of genres and strong visual tone that was going to be atmospheric and sophisticated in its nonlinear storytelling. It was going to have a real psychological element.”

The collaboration continued when the cameras rolled as well.

“Larysa had this great policy that whoever comes up with the best idea and it gets used on-screen gets a bottle of wine,” Dormer says. “It encourages you to speak up.”

Dormer plays Mrs. Appleyard, a buttoned-up, strict, and unflinching headmistress of a women’s college. “Appleyard thinks the way she is raising the girls she is doing them a favor. She genuinely thinks she’s passing on the torch of knowledge. What she’s actually doing is passing on archaic structures that stifle those girls’ spirits and that they’re rebelling against,” Dormer says. “She’s trying to help and tragically damaging and I just found that interesting — to try and break down that psychology.”

But that is all just a persona she is putting on, says Dormer.

“She’s running from a past — she’s literally running. She’s victimized and haunted by her past and her secrets, and her way of trying to deal with that is holding it tightly and putting a lid on it and being this tyrant,” she says.

As the episodes unfold, the audience learns how who she was as a girl informs the woman she has become. After the four young women go missing, she begins to unravel. That was the part of the draw of the role for Dormer.

“As an actor that’s just delicious to play — as the layers fall off, to keep scrambling to try to maintain control,” she says.

Though the series is set at the turn of the 20th century, its themes are still relevant today, says Dormer.

“It’s scary how 1900 and 2018, those themes of female independence — emotionally, spiritually, financially — finding a sense of identity, not needing a man, not being defined by being what your peer group suggests you should be, peer culture, authority rebellion, spirit and voice within those constructs [are similar],” she says. “I think in a highly anxious time for young men and women those anxieties of ‘Who the f— am I?’ are as relevant to our characters in 1900 as they are in 2018.”

Source / © Fremantlemedia Australia

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November 17, 2014   /   Claudia   /   2014 Game of Thrones (2012-) Hunger Games: Mockingjay Movie Productions Photo Gallery Projects Public Appearances Television Productions Video Archive

Yesterday Natalie visited Conan to promote Mockingjay and Game of Thrones. Enjoy some caps and two videos from the interview.


Gallery links:
Public Appereances > 2014 > Nov 17 | Conan

You can find links to the videos directly on Conan’s site.
Natalie Dormer On “Game Of Thrones” Season 5
Natalie Dormer On Training For “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay”

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July 20, 2013   /   Mel   /   News Posh (2014) Projects

Deadline.com has confirmed that Natalie has been cast in the movie Posh.

Natalie Dormer has joined the ensemble cast of Posh for director Lone Scherfig. The film follows two first-year students determined to join the infamous Riot Club, where reputations can be made or destroyed in one night. The Game Of Thrones actress, who next appears in the features Rush and The Counselor, is repped by UTA, Untitled Entertainment and United Artists.

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June 25, 2013   /   Mel   /   Game of Thrones (2012) News Projects

Game Of Thrones star Natalie Dormer is keen for a bit more air time in the show’s fourth series after she was omitted from the controversial Red Wedding episode and the season three finale.

The 31-year-old actress, who plays  Margaery Tyrell in the gritty HBO drama, is hoping her character will get the opportunity to react to the unexpected bloodshed next time around.

Quizzed on how she felt Margaery would have responded to the Red Wedding, Natalie told Entertainment Weekly: ‘I hope that you’ll see it in the future, in season 4. Something like the Red Wedding just goes to illustrate the darkness of Tywin Lannister. It’s one thing being a politically savvy family like the Tyrells, but it’s quite another to be so amoral, immoral, in your pursuit of power and control.

‘I think the Lannisters are the only family that would have orchestrated [something like] that. So yeah, I would imagine the reaction from the Tyrells — what happened to the Starks is going to terrorise them somewhat. I mean, these are the in-laws!’

She goes on to explain that she has made a conscious decision not to read the books and is yet to await her fate.

She continued: ‘I haven’t read the books on purpose. I’ve chosen not to. I know the broad strokes, the trajectory of what happens. Dan [Weiss] and David [Benioff] are very good at surprising us all.

‘Even when you know what is going to happen to your character, you have no idea of how or when it’s going to happen. So there is still a great level of unpredictability,’ she added.

Source

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June 25, 2013   /   Mel   /   Game of Thrones (2012) News Projects

Between now and June 28, the deadline for Emmy voters to submit nomination ballots, EW.com will feature interviews with some of the actors and actresses whose names we hope to hear when nominations are announced on July 18.

How does a bright-eyed, sweet-natured, deceptively ambitious teenage girl navigate the treacherous waters of King’s Landing society — not to mention the cruel nature of her sadistic husband-to-be and his scheming mother — without losing her head? Simple: By hiding her true motives behind a megawatt smile, wielding innocence and enthusiasm as skillfully as a swordsman brandishes his blade.

It also helps if that teenager is played by 31-year-old Natalie Dormer, a seasoned performer who specializes in masters of manipulation like The Tudors‘ Anne Boleyn (another noble with royal ambitions) and Elementary‘s Irene Adler/Moriarty.

In Dormer’s hands, these characters are never just seductive scam artists. Margaery Tyrell of Game of Thrones, for example, is certainly cunning — but in the actress’ mind, she’s also genuinely caring, thoughtful, and liberal-minded. “She has quite a modern take on power and how it operates, which is fascinating to play,” Dorner told EW in between screenings at the Edinburgh Film Festival. We’re guessing she was being sincere — though with an actress like this, it’s always just a little tough to tell for sure.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You first appeared on Game of Thrones in season 2, but your character didn’t really break out until season 3. Was there a particular moment this year when you started to feel like you had become a more integral part of the ensemble?
NATALIE DORMER:
Yeah, absolutely. I thought I’d talk to you about the crossbow scene in episode 2, with me and Jack [Gleeson] talking in Joffrey’s bedchamber.

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May 10, 2013   /   Mel   /   Elementary (2013) News Projects

[Warning: This story contains major spoilers from Thursday’s episode of Elementary. Read at your own risk!]

Irene Adler is alive!

That’s the bomb Elementary dropped on both Sherlock Holmes (Jonny Lee Miller) and the audience Thursday after a mysterious man claiming to be Moriarty led Holmes straight to his one and only love. Sherlock had long believed Irene (Natalie Dormer) to be dead after discovering a healthy amount of her blood in London. But she is, in fact, alive, having been held captive for the last 18 months. This, of course, raises the question: Why now? With Sherlock hot on Moriarty’s trail, how will Irene fit into all of this? TVGuide.com turned to Dormer to get the scoop on Irene’s return. Plus: Check out an exclusive sneak peek of the extended season finale promo below!

Tell us about this version of Irene Adler and how you play her.
Natalie Dormer:
When I went into the meeting with [executive producer] Rob Doherty to talk about playing her, we talked about how you have to choose an angle at how to play Irene depending on who your Sherlock is. The wonderful thing about the way Rob writes Elementary is that Sherlock has this issue of his addiction and this darkness and this vulnerability that he has due to being an addict. You could argue it’s a nice nod to the Arthur Conan Doyle novels in a way that other incarnations of modern-day Sherlocks don’t actually pick up on. So for me and Rob to have a conversation on how to tackle Irene, you’re very much aware that Irene Adler has to be the woman, the only woman who has ever gotten under the skin or close to — to terrorize or to invigorate — Sherlock. She’s intelligent, fiery, and Rob said she’s got a bit of the devil in her. She’s a nice yin to Sherlock’s yang. She’s stimulates him mentally as well as other areas, as we all know that’s what Sherlock responds to: being challenged and stimulated mentally. She’s a good foil. She makes him feel alive and feel human.

In present day, she’s been held captive for a long time, so what is the initial interaction like between Sherlock and Irene?
Dormer:
They’ve both been traumatized. She essentially has been incarcerated for 18 months and he’s been incarcerated within himself and dealing with his addiction, so they’ve both gone through a heavily traumatic experience. It’s that thing when you’ve been incredibly close to someone — the closest you can be to someone on a mental and emotional level — and then you go through trauma that changes you, then how do two people who have been so close react to each other when they meet as if they’re strangers? They’ve both come out of the other side that has altered them and their sense of self and identity and everything they thought and knew and believed about themselves. It’s really interesting to play. It’s a gift of a role and a story line for that reason because the chemistry is obviously still there. There was a bond between them which can never be denied and yet they’re strangers at the moment because of what they’ve been through. It’s very human in that it’s a heightened version of what it is to lose someone or the love of your life and find them again and the trauma in that.

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